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 LAHDR Brief Motivational Intervention Trainings

Our team of trainers and coaches at the Latino Alcohol & Health Disparities Research (LAHDR) Center have received the highest quality of training in MI and BMI by highly renowned trainers. Our Training Director Patricia Juarez, M.S., has been a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers (MINT) since 2001 and was mentored and supervised by the developer of MI, Dr. William Miller. LAHDR will be hosting a series of trainings and continuing education opportunities. These development opportunities will be used to build our communities capacity to provide Brief Motivational Interventions (BMI). The training model is estimated to be about 5-6 months.  

Upcoming Events

Check out our events page for upcoming training opportunities. 

Meet the Director

Our Center Director, Dr. Craig Field Ph.D. MPH, has conducted extensive research in the development and evaluation of BMI in the medical setting to promote health behavior change and improve health outcomes among Latinos and the underserved. He is a world renown trainer in BMI and is also an active member of the MINT.

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Dr. Craig Field

Center Director

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Meet the Trainers

Our team of trainers and coaches have received the highest quality of training in MI and BMI by highly renowned trainers. Our Training Director has been a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers since 2001 and was trained by Dr. William Miller, and our Training Coordinator has met the standards for joining this organization in 2018.

particia juarez ePatricia Juarez, M.S.

Training Director

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Reyna Puentes

Training Coordinator

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If you have any questions or need additional support in getting connected to a training, please contact Program Manager:

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Antonio M. Martinez, MSP

Program Manager
Latino Alcohol & Health Disparities Research Center
University of Texas at El Paso
500 W. University Avenue 
(915) 747-7371 

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LAHDR Training Model

 

BMI Training Description v7 05.15.08

 

 

Common FAQ's 

 

What is SBMI?

What is MI?

Why use SBMI?

What is the evidence?

Who can use SBMI?

Is a one or two-day training in SBMI enough?

What are some of the things you will learn in our SBMI training?

How do I benefit from participating in this SBMI training?

How can I get the most out of my training?

What “levels” of training are available?

Who is qualified to provide training in SBMI/MI?

 

 

What is SBMI?

Screening and Brief Motivational Interventions (SBMI) are conversations based on Motivational Interviewing that last from 15-30 minutes and incorporate specific clinical tasks that have been widely implemented and tested to be effective in addressing heavy drinking and associated problems, as well as other health-related behaviors.

 

 

What is MI?

Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a collaborative conversation style for strengthening a person’s own motivation and commitment to change. In other words, it is “a way of helping people give voice to their own reasons for change.” 
(Miller & Rollnick, 2013; Miller, 2009)

 

 

Why use SBMI?

SBMI has been demonstrated to improve clinical care, transform organizational culture, prepare organizations for healthcare changes, expand reach to new audiences, and replace less effective screening and intervention methods. A recent SAMSHA report indicates that there is “…substantial research on the effectiveness of SBMI in reducing risky alcohol consumption.” Our own LAHDR Director, Craig Field, MPH, Ph.D., has conducted extensive research in SBMI, which has indicated that these interventions are more effective than standard care, particularly among binge drinking Hispanics admitted for an alcohol-related injury in a medical setting.

 

 

What is the evidence?

Since its beginning in 1983, there are now more than 600 clinical trials published that support MI’s efficacy at reducing destructive behaviors, such as alcohol and substance misuse, and at promoting health behaviors, such as nutrition, exercise, and medical adherence. Both MI and SBMI have been shown to be particularly effective with clients that could be perceived as “difficult” or more “resistant” to change.

 

 

Who can use SBMI?

Both tools have been shown to be appropriate for professionals and community providers who may play crucial roles in helping people make better health decisions for themselves, and commit to them in the long run. These providers might include physicians, nurses, health educators, care managers, dietitians, social workers, counselors, psychologists, life coaches, clergy, supervision officers, personal trainers, and others.

 

 

Is a one or two-day training in SBMI enough?

We know from research that, to have the desired client outcomes, providers must adhere to the basic quality standards of SBMI and MI practice, which we now know require advanced post-training enhancement activities, such as post-workshop feedback and/or coaching (Miller et al., 2004).

 

 

What are some of the things you will learn in our SBMI training?

Learn and apply basic screening processes to identify heavy drinking, and to use as personalized feedback to tailor your conversation to your setting and your client.

  • Apply the basic structure and tools of SBMI to facilitate client conversations that evoke and promote their own motivation to change.
  • Learn to understand client ambivalence with clarifying questions and interviewing techniques that will help move your clients toward resolution in favor of change.
  • Learn and practice core SBMI skills and the "spirit" of MI to cultivate internal motivation and commitment.
  • Learn to offer pertinent information and advice in an MI-consistent way that would maximize the likelihood of this information being incorporated into the client’s decision-making processes.
  • Negotiate goals and plans for action in a collaborative way that emphasizes the individuals own readiness to change and promotes higher personal commitment.
  • Adjust your language, attitude, style, pace, and intervention strategies to identify Change and Sustain talk and respond more effectively and strategically to both.
  • Avoid the "Righting Reflex" and other clinical behaviors that may inhibit change. 
  • most importantly, you will be able to have more pleasant, meaningful, and productive conversations with your clients that promote long lasting change.

 

 

How do I benefit from participating in this SBMI training?

Free state of the art training and personalized coaching

  • Certificates of completion for training and advanced post-training activities
  • Free training materials and giveaways
  • Opportunity to network with other providers in the community to support skill maintenance and high-quality implementation 

 

 

How can I get the most out of my training?

To become a high-quality MI provider, you can commit to a minimum of two days (16 hours) of the full training model, and be willing to submit audio recordings to be evaluated for treatment adherence.

 

 

What “levels” of training are available?

Introduction to SBMI (12 hours), Introduction to MI (16 hours), Advanced MI (12 hours), Supervisory Skills (4 hours), and Basic MITI (8 hours) training.

*Trainings need to be supplemented with participation in learning groups and to receive coaching based on coded work samples to reach basic competency and/or proficiency.

 

 

Who is qualified to provide training in SBMI/MI?

An individual who has been coached and supervised, and has co-trained with an expert (preferably a MINT member). This individual must demonstrate proficiency based on MITI coding.

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